Early Literacy

Early childhood literacy skills set your child up for school success.

Early childhood literacy is all about setting your kids up for future success. By engaging children at an early age, there are five parts to help children develop: Talking, Singing and Rhyming, Reading, Writing, and Playing. Overall, reading readiness will lead to reading success, which will ultimately lead to school success for your child. At PGTPL, we help your child develop these skills through events, programs, and activities in the Children’s Room.

The single most important activity for building the knowledge required for eventual success in reading is reading aloud to children.

– US Department of Education

Get Your Kids Reading

Resources

Playful Learning Tips

  • Be playful and silly together.
  • Share a book every day, but stop when your child’s mind wanders. Keep it fun.
  • Read out loud from picture or chapter books. With babies, point to things and name them, too.
  • Say nursery rhymes, make animal sounds, and sing songs together.
  • Talk together about the story and pictures, explain the concepts.
  • Ask your child to name and describe things.
  • Get refrigerator magnets to help your child learn the alphabet, the sounds, and a few short words.
  • Talk with your child as you spend time together. Your child will soak up vocabulary like a sponge, so don’t limit yourself to simple words. Provide a language-rich environment!
  • Let your child see you reading, and he will want to learn how.
  • Buy your child some books of her own, especially the ones she wants to hear over and over.
  • Play rhyming and matching games, and make up more games together. If your child is named Jackie, call her “Jackie-zo-zackie” or “Jumping Jackie”, etc. Play “I Spy” by saying, “I spy, with my little eye, something in the room that rhymes with Mabel. What is it?”

Playful Learning Tips

  • Be playful and silly together.
  • Share a book every day, but stop when your child’s mind wanders. Keep it fun.
  • Read out loud from picture or chapter books. With babies, point to things and name them, too.
  • Say nursery rhymes, make animal sounds, and sing songs together.
  • Talk together about the story and pictures, explain the concepts.
  • Ask your child to name and describe things.
  • Get refrigerator magnets to help your child learn the alphabet, the sounds, and a few short words.
  • Talk with your child as you spend time together. Your child will soak up vocabulary like a sponge, so don’t limit yourself to simple words. Provide a language-rich environment!
  • Let your child see you reading, and he will want to learn how.
  • Buy your child some books of her own, especially the ones she wants to hear over and over.
  • Play rhyming and matching games, and make up more games together. If your child is named Jackie, call her “Jackie-zo-zackie” or “Jumping Jackie”, etc. Play “I Spy” by saying, “I spy, with my little eye, something in the room that rhymes with Mabel. What is it?”

Looking for more information on Early Childhood Literacy or the Children’s Room?

Our staff is more than happy to answer questions and help you find what you’re looking for!